Archive for the ‘ music games ’ Category

My First Spotify – “Name the Artist” trivia game

Like many, I was paying close attention last week during the run up to Spotify’s “big announcement”.  When they revealed their plan to integrate apps within their ecosystem, I was intrigued. I decided to jump right in and try and build something within Spotify for a couple of reasons: 1) They are a major player in the new music industry and its interesting to see how they are approaching apps.  2) I’ve been learning HTML5/JS and I saw an opportunity to put my skills to the test.  3) I’ve been meaning to revisit the amazing Echo Nest Platform, and after seeing this blog post by Paul Lamere I was inspired to give it a shot.  Now that I’ve gone through the process, I wanted to share the outcome as well as some tips and tricks I picked up along the way.

Continue reading

The King is Dead; Long Live the King

For some time now, we have been living with the indisputable “truth” that the music game genre is dead.  A lot of the ill will started last year, as people began to notice that the current crop of music games (i.e. Guitar Hero & Rock Band) were taking in substantially less revenue than they had been in previous years.  Fast forward a bit, and Activision’s recent decision to abandon the genre completely was seen by many as the final nail in the coffin.  Now, there are a number of ways to explain this decline: oversaturation of titles, unsustainable revenue from high-margin plastic instruments, the general public moving on to “the next big thing”, etc…. but that’s not what this post is about.  And yes, the more recent success of games like Just Dance and Dance Central is encouraging on a certain level, but I’m not so concerned with that either.  Rather, I’d like to question the notion that Guitar Hero  & Rock Band embody the end-all-be-all of music gaming, and therefore that their decline indicates the certain death of the genre outright. Continue reading

Games vs. Instruments

I’ve spent the better part of the past 5 years focused on answering a deceptively complex question: What are the best ways to adapt the art of music-making into compelling gameplay?  I’ve explored systems focused on performance, composition, mixing & production, so I use the term “music-making” broadly to refer to any activity associated with creating music

On the surface, it can appear to be straightforward.  If you’ve played Guitar Hero once or twice, it seems like such an obvious idea that it’s easy to overlook how much thought and attention went into arriving at that particular design.  Creating a game is about making choices.  A designer decides what he wants a player to do, how he wants it done, and how a player should feel while it happens.  There needs to be a clear definition of success and failure.  Playing a guitar satisfies none of these conditions; playing Guitar Hero satisfies all of them.  The difference between them is the difference between an Instrument and a Game. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: